Posts tagged “kilts

Tim is enthusiastic in his Skilt

Stoked to receive this comment from a customer who describes himself as ‘very satisfied’.  Thanks Tim.

After several centuries of brainwashing to the contrary, ordinary men throughout the western world are beginning to realise that the wearing of skirt type garments is practical, logical, and extremely comfortable. So why the hell not do it?

 
And if it’s a skirt type garment you’re after that looks great on a bloke – you’ve come to the right place! This wide selection of exquisitely tailored ‘skilts’ is, I reckon, about the best in the world. Each pleat is individually cut to a broad flare and sewn so the whole thing hangs beautifully from your waist. What you see in the pictures is what you get. 
 
I bought three: 
 
Indigo denim kiltDENIM – rough and tough as any pair of Levis I ever wore to work (but with the added advantage it will never wear out at the knees or pockets)
 
SONY DSCCORDUROY – same as above, but softer and cosy warm. If you’re off on a days hike down on the coast with your lunch and a hip flask you’d be an absolute idiot not to don one of these!
 
Black Flock KiltBLACK FLOCK – if you think this one LOOKS stunning…you should FEEL what it’s like to wear. BLOODY HELL!! I guarantee you will never, EVER, want to take it off!

Order out of Skilt chaos

2015-07-16 16.01.41

After years of having garment rails in my lounge I now have a dedicated wardrobe for clients to browse.  One of every stye and size of Skilt available – all neat and tidy.  Next time you are in London why not come over and have a look?


Come and buy a Skilt at Le Boutique Bazaar in London on Sunday 1st February

Kilts at La Boutique Bazaar

Skilt will have a stall at this event alongside c40 other alternative designers.  I’ve been before and even the crowd is worth looking at.  Why not come along for a try on, or just a cocktail and a mooch?

The price is £7 on the door but if you email me that you are coming I can put your name on the £5 guest list.

Here is a link to the facebook page so you can see who else will be there.


Nick is feeling reflective in his biker Skilt

Nick is reflective in his kiltThe The biker Skilt … not just for biking!


Stefan stays modest in his new Skilt

Stefan in his kilt

New customer Stefan from Sweden demonstrating two features of the Skilt: the moveable and removable pockets, and the way the front apron hangs between the legs to protect your modesty.  He seems pretty happy with the service too:

“The kilt arrived today. It’s absolutely gorgeous and the size is perfect.
Thanks for fast delivery and good service. The weekend is saved :)”

Good on you Stefan – and good luck with your Skilt wearing in the Swedish winter!

If you like kilts in general and our Skilts in particular please consider liking some of these pages to help other kilt fans find them.  🙂


Kristian and friends hit Nice in their Skilts

Richard,
Loving the kilts! The most comfortable thing i’ve ever worn! About to hit Nice and spread the word (i’m in the steampunk on right)!  Hope to do a custom one in collaboration with Tom Baker http://tombakerlondon.com/ (NOT Ted)
Kind regards
Kristian
Kilts in Nice

Dr Franz wears his Skilt hiking in the Bavarian Alps

Apparently it wasn’t just the cows who were showing an interest!

Hiking kilt Hiking kilt


BBC News – Sweden male train drivers wear skirts after shorts row

A dozen male train drivers in Sweden have circumvented a ban on shorts by wearing skirts to work in hot weather.

The workers, who operate the Roslagsbanan line north of the capital Stockholm, have been wearing skirts to work for the past two weeks.

Employer Arriva banned the drivers from wearing shorts after taking over the running of the line in January.

But the company has given the men its blessing to wear skirts, according to local newspaper Mitti.”

Our thinking is that one should look decent and proper when representing Arriva and the present uniforms do that. If the man only wants [to wear] a skirt then that is OK,” Arriva communications manager Tomas Hedenius told the paper.

“To tell them to do something else would be discrimination.”

Driver Martin Akersten told the BBC he and his colleagues came up with the idea to wear skirts after they were informed of the new company dress code in the winter.

“We have always said that when summer comes, we will get some skirts and wear them. Its very warm weather here so we would like to wear shorts but if we cant then we have skirts for comfort”.

via BBC News – Sweden male train drivers wear skirts after shorts row.


Greg rocks Paris in his black cord Skilt

Greg in his black cord kilt

According to Greg though Paris may be regarded by many as the fashion capital of the world Parisiens are not so confident when it comes to wearing what they design. “You’ve got London for that” he says.  Greg’s just been back to pick out his second Skilt: another black one but with fire insert pleats.  We are sure he’ll set Paris alight.


Union Flag kilt featured on the Alan Titchmarsh show

I appeared on the Alan Titchmarsh show today and I was able to wear one of our fabulous Union Jack kilts.

The section of the show was related to the mens’ prostate cancer charity Movember and bizarre (I would have said magnificent) facial hair in general.  I was invited to attend as I recently became British freestyle beard champion.

If you can be bothered to sit though the adverts our section starts at 17 minutes: Alan Titchmarsh show

Please donate to my Movember page


The clothes that make the man | smh.com.au

From Braveheart’s era to the present day, the kilt has been synonymous with masculinity. But isn’t it just a skirt?

From Braveheart to the hard-drinking, ginger-haired Scots who cause a boozy ruckus at weddings, the kilt has long been synonymous with a rough-and-tumble sense of masculinity.

But change the fabric from tartan to a block colour and iron out the pleats and you have yourself a fetching knee-length skirt – an article of clothing the aforementioned filmic and social warriors wouldn’t be caught dead in.

While fashion designer Marc Jacobs has pioneered the idea of the male skirt by wearing them publicly on different occasions, it’s largely considered the by-product of eccentric creativity as opposed to a valid style choice, whereas the kilt, though carrying a different historical weight, is perfectly acceptable.

But what’s the big difference? Dr Mary Tomsic, lecturer in history and popular culture at The University of Melbourne, chalks it up to a gendered society.

“Clothing is practical, but also highly symbolic, so it is a key avenue through which gender is learned and encoded. One needs only to walk into a children’s clothing shop to clearly see how different girls and boys should be dressed … I see this as being restrictive for both boys and girls,” she said.

“There are a range of factors at play in determining the gender of clothing and these change over time in response to a range of factors: political movements like feminism and women’s liberation, cultural movements like glam rock, social and political needs like women wearing pants and work clothes during WWII, and commercial interests like companies identifying men as consumers, as per the metrosexual movement.”

Indeed, there have been moments in history when we’ve seen a blurring of gender lines. As Tomsic suggests, glam rock pioneers such as David Bowie and his spandex and makeup wearing cohorts showed men of the ’70s that sexual and gender ambiguity wasn’t to be feared but celebrated. But while the lavish stage costumes went on to influence such bands as Kiss, Culture Club and Mötley Crüe, it didn’t result in a broader knock-on effect because everyday consumers were still reluctant to buy clothes they saw as feminine.

“I think escaping the gender order is very difficult and strict gender codes can be restrictive for people in terms of expressing their sense of self … It shouldn’t matter at all – but it does – which tells us something about how society reads, understands and values women and men,” Tomsic said.

“I would like there to be less interest in coding clothes as belonging exclusively to either women or men. I can’t really see any benefits of coding clothes and fashion within a strict gendered regime.”

Though there is evidence that the tide is turning. Once considered a fringe item, male pantyhose – or mantyhose – have infiltrated the broader public sphere and now make up a small, yet noticeable, percentage of stocking sales. Executives from upscale Italian hosiery company Emilio Cavallini told The New York Times that since introducing a unisex line in 2009 they have seen sales steadily increase to a point where male customers are now an appreciable portion of their overall business.

It’s a trend that’s only going to gain steam as it becomes more accepted by the mainstream, says Chan Kraemer of mantyhose marketing website e-Mancipate.

“Fashion is always about exploring, about pushing the limits. That’s the natural way and critics are welcome,” he said.

“We are close to reaching the critical mass. And why not? Mantyhose are functional, they are basically unisex, simple to wear … they can replace socks, give different levels of warmth. I like that I can use the same trousers from fall to spring, only changing the thickness of the hosiery worn under. I mean it can greatly simplify the dressing process, which is very practical – and men do like practical things.”

Pantyhose weren’t always considered the sole domain of women. From the Middle Ages up until the 17th century, male hosiery was not only accepted but a common part of a man’s wardrobe. Even today, some segments of the male population continue to wear them, including athletes and those prone to poor circulation or varicose veins.

Though tights are more popular in Europe where they are generally thicker and feature designs considered more masculine such as skulls and checks, it’s difficult to imagine them taking off in Australia on account of our temperate climate and blokey culture. But that could all change according to Dr Tomsic, who says that shifts can occur with the right pioneers.

“Footballers have been wearing running tights for a while now … As we start seeing men, and in the case of AFL footballers, men who are understood as the bastions of masculinity wearing them, they become acceptable, and hence can possibly shift to other realms,” she said.

“When high-profile manly men wear such items they can have a significant influence with other men … For instance David Beckham in his sarong and nail polish had significant impact on trends, and what is then acceptable for more mainstream men to wear.”

While it remains to be seen if stockings will one day be viewed as completely genderless, there are signs that boundaries are slowly breaking down and marketers are starting to respond. Chan also likes to remind critics of one proudly masculine proponent of items traditionally associated with women.

“Hey guys, even Superman wears mantyhose,” he said.

via The clothes that make the man | smh.com.au.


Satisfied customer: Jaakko from Finland plays mandolin in his Skilt

The kilt was made using some of our last grey flannel fabric and features a panel of Dashing Tweed at the back.

The instrument is an octave mandolin a.k.a. short scale bouzouki.

If you enjoyed this post about modern kilts please help other people find it by pressing the G+1 button below:


Q: Why Do We Wear Pants / trousers? A: Horses – Alexis Madrigal – The Atlantic

Q: Why Do We Wear Pants? A: Horses

JUL 11 2012, 2:22 PM ET 61

The surprisingly deep history of trouser technology.

Whence came pants? I’m wearing pants right now. There’s a better than 50 percent chance that you, too, are wearing pants. And neither of us have probably asked ourselves a simple question: Why?

It turns out the answer is inexplicably bound up with the Roman Empire, the unification of China, gender studies, and the rather uncomfortable positioning of man atop horse, at least according to University of Connecticut evolutionary biologist Peter Turchin.

“Historically there is a very strong correlation between horse-riding and pants,” Turchin wrote in a blog post this week. “In Japan, for example, the traditional dress is kimono, but the warrior class (samurai) wore baggy pants (sometimes characterized as a divided skirt), hakama. Before the introduction of horses by Europeans (actually, re-introduction – horses were native to North America, but were hunted to extinction when humans first arrived there), civilized Amerindians wore kilts.”

The reasons why pants are advantageous when mounted atop a horse should be obvious, nonetheless, many cultures struggled to adapt, even when their very existences were threatened by superior, trouser-clad horseback riders.

Turchin details how the Romans eventually adopted braccae (known to you now as breeches) and documents the troubles a 3rd-century BC Chinese statesman, King Wuling, had getting his warriors to switch to pants from the traditional robes. “It is not that I have any doubt concerning the dress of the Hu,” Wuling told an advisor. “I am afraid that everybody will laugh at me.” Eventually, a different state, the Qin, conquered and unified China. They just so happened to be closest to the mounted barbarians and thus were early to the whole cavalry-and-pants thing.

Turchin speculates that because mounted warriors were generally men of relatively high status, the culture of pants could spread easily throughout male society.

I’d add one more example from history: the rise of the rational dress movement in conjunction with the widespread availability of the bicycle. Here’s a University of Virginia gloss:

The advent and the ensuing popularity of the safety bicycle, with its appeal to both sexes mandated that women cast off their corsets and figure out some way around their long, billowy skirts. The answer to the skirt question was to be found in the form of bloomers, which were little more than very baggy trousers, cinched at the knee. Bloomers provoked wrath in conservatives and delight in women cyclists, and the garment was to become the centerpiece of the “rational dress” movement that sprung up at the end of the 19th century.

What all these examples suggest is that technological systems — cavalry, bicycling — sometimes require massive alterations in a society’s culture before they can truly become functional. And once it’s locked in, the cultural solution (pants) to an era’s big problem can be more durable than the activity (horse-mounted combat) that prompted it.

via Q: Why Do We Wear Pants? A: Horses – Alexis Madrigal – The Atlantic.


New all tapestry kilts

Check out our new 100% tapestry kilts.  We got a couple of rolls of this fabric at a very special price so we can sell these to you for just £195 each.  Visit our shop.

We like the leopard kilt teamed up with a plain black jacket to bring out the spots:

We call the next one our ‘Abstract Plants kilt‘ … like gardening on acid.  We think it’s got a bit of an art deco / dandy look to it so we’ve teamed it here with a velvet smoking jacket:

 


Kilts at the Barbican Centre on Sunday 18th December

 

Do come and visit us at the Duckie Christmas market at the Barbican Centre this Sunday December 18th. We’ll be there from 2pm-9pm and filled with Christmas cheer, and mince pies from the other vendors.  There are some lovely new kilts to see, that haven’t made it up on to the website yet!


Kenneth Goldsmith debuts his Skilt in NYC

We are delighted to welcome American poet and awesome beard wearer Kenneth Goldsmith to the Skilt wearing brotherhood.

Kenneth debuted his Grey Flannel Skilt with Dashing Tweed insert pleat at an event in NYC.  We think he looks fabulous:


Satisfied customer: Willem from the Netherlands is loving the reactions to his new Skilt

Willem popping down to the village centre in his new safari print Skilt

On 15 September 2011 we were delighted to receive this poetic note of thanks from Willem in the Netherlands:

Silence comes most of the time, when something hits you.!!!!

This afternoon, the mail man was ringing at the doorbell. He delivered a parcel. It’s the brown big safari cat-kilt.

The way the parcel was delivered, is more than a royal treatment.

This kilt was wrapped in a special cloth- container, where it is stored away, dust and light-free.

Then I changed kilt, and was so thrilled, I went to the village- center for shopping.

There were more than 8 reactions from men and women, and all of them were very positive.

This safari-Kilt is a very new part in my KILT-Wearing, comfortable, beautiful Flock-print, soft cloth and a very comfortable way of wearing.

It fits and feels better, than a suit.( Sorry to say, gentlemen)

No doubt about it, want quality ? BUY SKILTS.!!!!

With kind regards,

W,Jansen, The Netherlands.


Satisfied customer: Rychard gives his Skilt the steampunk treatment

Rychard in black cotton drill d-ring kilt and military science fiction costume for “The Admiralty Ball”.


Warning: It is sinful for men to wear kilts (c/o dividedbytruth.org)

Not everyone believes that the wearing a kilt is symbolic of an emotionally mature man but this article on www.dividedbytruth.org argues that it is, in fact, sinful!  The author suggests that kilt wearers are silly and foolish looking sissies who lack refinement, cultivation, or taste.

It only seems fair to share this information so you can decide for yourself. 🙂

“The woman shall not wear that which pertaineth unto a man, neither shall a man put on a woman’s garment: for all that do so are abomination unto the LORD thy God.” -Deuteronomy 22:5. This Scripture naturally raises questions as to–what is men’s and women’s clothing? The Bible warns effeminate men in 1st Corinthians 6:9-10, “Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God? Be not deceived: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate … shall inherit the kingdom of God.” Let’s establish from the start, that the Word of God condemns effeminate men. “Effeminate” in 1st Corinthians 6:9, comes from the Greek, “malakos,” which means “soft, i.e. fine (clothing).” We read in VINE’S COMPLETE EXPOSITORY DICTIONARY OF OLD AND NEW TESTAMENT WORDS, concerning the word “effeminate” …

“soft, soft to the touch” (Lat., mollis, Eng., “mollify,” “emollient,” etc.), is used (a) of raiment, Matt. 11:8 (twice); Luke 7:25; (b) metaphorically, in a bad sense, 1 Cor. 6:9, “effeminate,” not simply of a male who practices forms of lewdness, but persons in general, who are guilty of addiction to sins of the flesh, voluptuous.”

Although 1st Corinthians 6:9 is clearly condemning homosexuality and cross-dressing, it is also equally clear that any form of femininity in a man is sinful. This is why Deuteronomy 22:5 condemns men wearing women’s apparel. Clearly, it is not acceptable for men to wear women’s clothing. Men are to be men! Men should talk like men, dress like men, walk like men, and act like men. Kilts on men are sissyish. Although a man wearing a kilt may be tough, the skirt makes him look silly and foolish. Although most men who wear kilts aren’t gay, it makes one wonder why any man would ever want to wear clothing that is considered women’s apparel by 99% of the population. A quick look at any bathroom door will quickly reveal that men wear pants, and women wear dresses.

Men’s Clothing Verses “Soft Raiment”

Jesus said in Matthew 11:8, “But what went ye out for to see? A man clothed in soft raiment? behold, they that wear soft clothing are in kings’ houses.” John the Baptist was rugged, as a man should be. The men who lived in the palace wore “soft” clothing, i.e., they didn’t look or act like REAL MEN. I’ve never seen a construction worker wearing a kilt. I’ve never seen a truck mechanic or a coal miner wearing a kilt. I only see men with clean jobs, or playing bagpipes, wearing kilts. Kilts are for men in the palace, not for John the Baptist type men … real men!

Did men Wear Skirts in the Old Testament?

No, they wore robes with outer skirts. This is VERY different from the skirts we see today. The photo to the right shows what men wore in the Old Testament. This is NO kilt! We read in 1st Samuel 24:5, “And it came to pass afterward, that David’s heart smote him, because he had cut off Saul’s skirt.” David had been running for his life from king Saul. While Saul and his men were sleeping, David infiltrated the group and cut off a piece of Saul’s “skirt.” However, the Bible reveals that the skirt was simply a part of Saul’s robe, and not a skirt by itself. This is evidenced by 1st Samuel 24:11, “Moreover, my father, see, yea, see the skirt of thy robe in my hand: for in that I cut off the skirt of thy robe and killed thee not, know thou and see that there is neither evil nor transgression in mine hand, and I have not sinned against thee; yet thou huntest my soul to take it.” Although Verse 5 says “skirt,” it is abundantly clear from Verse 11 that Saul was NOT wearing a short skirt like a women. Saul had a robe, with an outer skirt.

The FACT that men did NOT wear skirts in the Bible is further evidenced by the words of Ruth to Boaz in Ruth 3:9, “And she answered, I am Ruth thine handmaid: spread therefore thy skirt over thine handmaid; for thou art a near kinsman.” If Boaz was wearing a skirt, like many people today contend, then Boaz would have had to remove his skirt in order to spread it over Ruth. Which means Boaz would have been either partially or completely naked. This didn’t happen! Furthermore, Boaz and Ruth weren’t married until Ruth 4:13, so there was no physical relationship between Boaz and Ruth at the time of Ruth 3:9. So what did Ruth mean when she asked Boaz to spread his “skirt” over her? She was simply saying, “Take me to be yours.” She wanted Boaz to take her under his outer skirt, under his wing so-to-speak. It would be absurd to interpret this Scripture any other way.

Now think of a man in a kilt, and try to imagine how he would “spread his skirt” over someone. It would be impossible while he was wearing it. Clearly, men in the Old Testament didn’t wear the type of skirts or kilts, which some uncouth (lacking refinement or cultivation or taste) men wear today. There’s just something uncouth about a man wearing a kilt!

Women in the Old Testament also wore robes with skirts; but they were more feminine, cut differently, and made with more feminine materials. Clothing which was transparent, tight fitting, loosely worn, or exposed intimate parts of the body were considered the ATTIRE OF A HARLOT (Proverb 7:10).

by Robert J. Stewart


What kind of man wears a kilt? A mature one.

We believe that, in addition to looking and feeling great, the kilt is a symbol of the mature masculine.  A mature man is a man who has faced his emotions, stood up, and freed himself from the social expectations of the old fashioned macho man.

The best description I have found for the new macho is by Boysen Hodgson published was on the Mankind Project website.  If you score 80% give yourself a pat on the back and consider rewarding yourself with a brand new Skilt!

‘He cleans up after himself.

He cleans up the planet.

He is a role model for young men.

He is rigorously honest and fiercely optimistic.

He holds himself accountable.

He knows what he feels.

He knows how to cry and he lets it go.

He knows how to rage without hurting others.

He knows how to fear and how to keep moving.

He seeks self-mastery.

He’s let go of childish shame.

He feels guilty when he’s done something wrong.

He is kind to men, kind to women, kind to children.

He teaches others how to be kind.

He says he’s sorry.

He stopped blaming women or his parents or men for his pain years ago.

He stopped letting his defenses ruin his relationships.

He stopped letting his penis run his life.

He has enough self respect to tell the truth.

He creates intimacy and trust with his actions.

He has men that he trusts and that he turns to for support.

He knows how to roll with it.

He knows how to make it happen.

He is disciplined when he needs to be.

He is flexible when he needs to be.

He knows how to listen from the core of his being.

He’s not afraid to get dirty.

He’s ready to confront his own limitations.

He has high expectations for himself and for those he connects with.

He looks for ways to serve others.

He knows he is an individual.

He knows that we are all one.

He knows he is an animal and a part of nature.

He knows his spirit and his connection to something greater.

He knows that the future generations are watching his actions.

He builds communities where people are respected and valued.

He takes responsibility for himself and is also willing to be his brother’s keeper.

He knows his higher purpose.

He loves with fierceness.

He laughs with abandon, because he gets the joke.’