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Satisfied customer: Stephen thinks his army Skilt is brilliant

Richard

All I can say is fantastic. Fit is great, wife is impressed, daughter likes, the whole thing is brilliant. Was planing for the first outing to be the Army v Navy game in May but now looking for any excuse to be able to wear it.

I will get the wife to take some photos soon, she wants to put them on her Facebook, and I will send them to you. A few colleagues have shown interest, so now I have mine, I will be taking in to work to show them.

Once again thank you and a fantastic job.

Stephen

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The kilt was invented by an Englishman

According to Andrew Bolton’s ‘Bravehearts – Men in Skirts‘ the modern style of kilt known as the ‘little wrap’ (feileadh beag) was invented in the first quarter of the 18th century … by an Englishman!  The little wrap was an evolution of the ‘big wrap’ or belted plaid (feileadh beag).

The belted plaid was constructed from a large rectangular piece of material about 5 feet wide and roughly 14-16 feet long and served as garment during the day and blanket at night.  In order to put the garment on the man would first pleat the cloth by hand and then secure it in place with a belt.  The end of the plaid could be worn in various arrangements over the shoulder(s) to keep the weather off.

For a great pictorial explanation of how to put on a belted plaid check out the website of the Clansman Centre.

How many thousands of man days went into this daily pleating exercise?  English highland dress fan Thomas Rawlinson had a bright idea that would make the kilt much easier to wear: to stitch down the tops of the pleats and so form the general style of the kilt we know and love today.  How he came to invent the kilt is explained in a letter by Mr Baille of Aberiachan published in the Edinburgh Magazine in March 1785:

‘About 50 years ago, one Thomas Rawlinson, an Englishman, conducted an iron work carried on in the countries of Glengarie and Lochaber; he had a throng of Highlanders employed in the service, and became very fond of the highland dress, and wore it in the neatest form; which I can aver, as I become personally acquainted with him above 40 years ago.  He was a man of genius and quick parts, and thought it no great stretch of invention to abridge the dress, and make it handy and convenient for his workmen: and accordingly directed the using of the lower part plaited of what is called the felie or kilt as above, and the upper part was set aside…  It was found so handy and convenient that, in the shortest space, the use of it became frequent in all the Highland Countries, and in many of our northern Low Countries also.’

I think it is great that Scotsmen are happy to embrace good design when they see it.  I’m always very pleased when a Skilt makes it’s way north of the border!

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Draught guidance: a kilt need underwear – Telegraph

The Scottish Tartans Authority has decreed that refusing to put on underwear beneath a kilt is “childish and unhygienic”.

It also warned that “going commando” flies in the face of decency.

Tartans Authority director Brian Wilton said kilt wearers should have the “common sense” to realise they should wear underwear beneath their country’s national dress.

He said “The idea that you are not a real Scot unless you are bare under your kilt should be thrown into the same wastepaper basket as the idea that you’re not a real Scot unless you put salt on your porridge.

“People should not be browbeaten into believing that nonsense. Just because Highlanders wore nothing in the days before Y-fronts were invented doesn’t mean that we, in the 21st Century, should wear nothing too.

via Draught guidance: a kilt need underwear – Telegraph.

My thoughts:

Can’t say that I agree.  I recommend that London kilts are worn with uncommon indecency!

Tip: if you are concerned about hygiene simply safety pin a piece of fabric to the inside of the front apron.  You can change it as often as you like without needing to wash the whole kilt.

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Happy Xmas from Skilt – the London kilt

This isn’t a new image but it seems timely for me to post it onto the blog.

Max brought this Kilted (OK, I know it’s a hula skirt!) Santa back from Hawaii.  She’s away in Australia right now … I wonder if she’ll find a kilted kangaroo or something while she’s out there?

Have a great winter solstice and Christmas holiday.

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Satisfied customer: Justin’s Skilt is an awesome pleasure to wear

Hey Richard,

I’ve worn the kilt twice since it arrived an it’s awsome from top to bottom lol, what a beautifull garment.  The pockets are an absolute bonus an the amount of room in them is good, the silver buttons against the material looks every bit as good as the one worn by your model on your internet web site, and as for the material it feels good against the skin and hangs well.   I must say it was well recieved by friends an family and an absolute pleasure to wear.

I can only thank you for creating a truly beautifull garment.

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Best responses when someone informs you that ‘that’s not a real / proper kilt’

How do you know?

I agree, it’s a completely un-real kilt

I agree, it’s a completely im-proper kilt

I assume by the trousers that you’re English … (they probably aren’t)

My other kilt’s a (enter tartan here), I use this one for town … it has more luggage space and gets better milage

 

 

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Best reasons to wear a kilt

No need to unzip a kilt in the bathroom (think ‘There’s Something About Mary’!)

Kilt checks!

Skilts have roomy pockets that do not move when your legs do

Women check out men in kilts

Gay men check out men in kilts (even if it’s not your bag a complement is a complement)

Straight men check out men in kilts and admire you for having the balls to wear one

It’s better to run away with your kilt up than get caught with your pants down!

As Braveheart says: ‘Freedom!’

It would be selfish to keep those calves to yourself

Women are attracted to confidence and it takes confidence to wear a kilt

Kilts are great to dance in: plenty of ball room!

Kilts make people wonder